Wednesday, March 1, 2017

A South Indian Garden

It's been a mild weather here lately, but this winter we escaped for awhile anyway.  The past couple weeks we have been traveling and visiting relatives in much warmer southern India!


Mr. Red House's aunt lives near Bangalore (or Bangaluru, as it is now officially known by), and she is renowned for her welcoming spirit and gracious hosting talents, as well as for her beautiful garden.  I have visited here before, but only in the evening, so I was very excited to be able to enjoy the garden in daylight this time.


Come on in...


....preferably by following the walkway that travels under a thick canopy of flowering vines.


Who knows what you will find?  I believe this extraordinary flower is called 'Duck Plant' locally.  It is likely from the Aristolochia genus, a far relative of our Dutchman's Pipe vine.

One of my daughters checking out a water feature in the garden
The delightful walkway then leads one to the backyard's wide lawn, which is edged with garden beds, including a small waterfall with plantings.


Is that Sansevieria trifasciata (aka Mother-in-Law's Tongue or Snake Plant) I spy planted to the left of the waterfall?  It is so interesting to see plants in garden beds that I think of as houseplants here in our northern climate.  On the other side of the lawn is a more shady garden bed with a row of Peace lilies, another well-known houseplant here.


Though there are definitely also some plants I am less familiar with.  I was quite taken by what I believe is Euphorbia milii (aka Crown of Thorns).


Such vicious thorns, but such vivid flowers!


Another favorite was the Yellow Chalice Vine in front whose spectacular yellow flowers were almost as large as my head.

Yellow Chalice Vine
I also love surprises in the garden, and at the back of the yard there is quite a gem.  One's eye is drawn to the river of red Salvia that borders the back of the lawn...


which leads to a striking stand of Birds of Paradise standing amongst billowing pink Cosmos...


...but hidden behind the blooms is whole other garden.  If one peeks behind the flowers, one discovers a kitchen garden with divided plots for fresh herbs and vegetables.  I love it!

the vegetable garden
The property is bordered by trees and more flowering vines, including several different colors of Bougainvillea.


So many flowers, and such a pretty sight to see in winter!


It was so great to see relatives and visit places that we don't often get to see.  We are now back home in the States, recovering from jet lag, and looking forward to our own flowers in the rapidly approaching spring...


...though maybe still dreaming a bit of tropical blooms and fresh coconuts.


14 comments:

  1. Wow. So cool. Thanks for sharing the pics.

    Is that a crape myrtle in the first photo? It's fun to see it in its native habitat!

    The yellow chalice vine is amazing. I'd never seen (or even heard of) it before.

    The veggie garden. The bird of paradise. It all looks delightful!

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    1. No, that is actually another bouganvillea. They just grow that big there. She had several different colors of bourganvillea around the property and even a doubled blooming one, which was interesting to see.

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  2. Oh my, that is beautiful and I can feel the warmth radiating from the screen.

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    1. It did get quite warm, especially in the afternoons!

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  3. How colorful! That Euphorbia is something else indeed. Beautiful.

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    1. It was a fun plant, and one you don't usually see in our northern climate gardens up here!

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  4. Indie - I have seen Crown of Thorns in nurseries here but I have never been tempted because of the thorns. The sansivieria I grow outdoors but in wicked winters, it gets knocked back. Loved auntie's Chalice Vine, Bird of Paradise and the way she made raised beds with clay. I'm assuming she made mud pie to form those beds. Would have been an interesting blog post to read the how-to's.

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    1. Their climate is definitely more like yours down there. I don't think I could grow a plant that thorny in the garden either, as I'm just too clumsy! The way the raised beds were made with the clay seemed similar to how the farmers in India made the edge of their rice paddy beds when we were passing through farmlands. It looks very nice, and you use what you've got!

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  5. Indie, thank you for a peek into this gorgeous garden! I am surprised that it looks much like a garden I might see here in the southern USA, except for the exotic Duck Plant. The of Bird of Paradise, with the kitchen garden behind, is a real treat!

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    1. True, it does look a little like a southern garden, with the borders with tropical touches, wide lawn, and reddish clay soil!

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  6. I wish my garden could look so well kept, your Aunt's garden looks like a beautiful botanical garden ... that Aristolochia, could it be the 'gaping dutchman's pipe'?

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    1. Yes, very possibly. When looking it up, that was the one I thought it was, but I wasn't sure, not being familiar with it. A very striking flower!

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  7. I love that stand of Birds of Paradise.

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  8. I got badly injured in an accident, and I had fracture in both my legs, so I was confined in my home. I liked sitting in my balcony in evening, so my friend helped decorating my balcony with living walls with fresh flowers that attracts onlookers much easily, so most of them tried having light conversation with me too, and it really helped me to feel happy from inside.

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